Looking for your discount program? Create an account or log in here.

3 Reasons Company Culture Is So Important Amidst COVID-19

Company culture has transformed from a popular HR buzzword to an important element that companies give serious consideration to. As COVID-19 continues to impact how companies manage their employees and their business, culture is more important than ever. Check out a few reasons why keeping up with your company culture is so important right now!

1. Recruitment, Hiring, and Onboarding

During the early stages of the coronavirus, things like recruitment and hiring came to a halt for many companies as they worked to navigate the rough waters of the pandemic. However, it’s become increasingly apparent that we can no longer put important processes like hiring on hold. Instead, we must focus on transforming them, just as many companies have done with other facets of their work.

Company culture has always been an important part of recruitment and hiring. It’s a wonderful way for candidates to better understand the inner workings of the company they’re applying and interviewing at. This is why it should be at the forefront of all HR professionals’ minds while determining a new hiring process.

For example, how do you utilize social media to convey company culture? This is especially important given candidates often can’t meet with you or experience your workplace in person. Consider the interview process, especially for the companies and employees deemed essential. How do you show candidates what steps you’re taking to ensure employee health and safety? Upon hiring, do you have a carefully thought-out and prepared plan to onboard an employee who may have to work remotely for the foreseeable future? All of these are questions that will reflect your company culture. Therefore, you should be considering each one as you develop a new hiring plan amidst the coronavirus.

2. Communication

For many companies during the COVID-19 pandemic, communication has become vital. As a company with essential employees, communicating new health guidelines or changes in hours should be done in a timely manner. As a company whose employees have remained remote, online communication has become one of the only ways to transmit important messages and information.

No matter what your business is, you likely know the importance of communication. But what many don’t realize is how communication and company culture are connected. Remember, company culture isn’t just about weekly happy hours or interesting amenities at your workplace. It’s also about how you value your employees’ health and wellbeing, and how you transparently demonstrate that to them. To keep your company culture strong during the pandemic, reinforce your support of employees by keeping communication constant and educational, and offering a space for them to respond if needed. Work to quickly develop new guidelines based on the information you’re receiving. Then, communicate them to your employees in a way that is digestible and concise. Use different communication channels to send out messages with varying degrees of importance. This way, employees can quickly understand the gravity of a given situation.

For example, PerkSpot leverages a few different communication channels. We rely on Slack to communicate more casual notices, like a fun company-wide initiative or virtual event. We depend on email to send out important messages, like new in-office guidelines or rules for quarantining. Plus, we hold a regular cadence of company-wide meetings, creating a forum in which employees can get updates on other departments and ask questions about future plans or team developments. This effective and transparent system of communicating helps employees better fulfill their roles and responsibilities, thus creating a culture of connected and engaged employees!

3. Productivity and Engagement

Speaking of engagement, there’s no doubt of the connection between company culture and a productive and engaged workforce. A study by Queens School of Business and the Gallup Organization found disengaged workers showed 37% more absenteeism, 49% more accidents, and 60% more errors. Plus, that disengagement translated to 18% lower productivity!

A positive company culture, on the other hand, typically produces more engaged employees. This is because it promotes general employee wellness, support, and respect. If leaders or management put too much of an emphasis on working long hours or being overly productive, without mentioning the value of daily breaks or acknowledging employees’ hard work, a stressful and negative culture can quickly emerge. So, how can you promote a culture of employee wellness and support? Encourage employees to take breaks away from their work, especially if they’re remote. Offer resources that foster both physical and mental wellbeing and motivate leaders in your company to set an example by doing so as well. Recognize your employees going above and beyond to produce great results, which promotes a more engaged workforce and a culture of workplace appreciation.

For example, as an employee discount provider, PerkSpot employees receive all of the benefits that we offer our clients! That means PerkSpotters have access to discounted mental health apps, home workout products, and more. Plus, we add and highlight new discounts that are relevant to the wellbeing of employees regularly so employees are aware of them. These perks are a great way for leadership to demonstrate how they prioritize the health of their employees which, in turn, leads to a more productive and engaged workforce!

For many years, company culture has been a way for companies to highlight their values to current and potential employees. But amidst an unprecedented pandemic, company culture also offers the opportunity to help promote stronger engagement and more informative communication. Plus, it’s the perfect way to attract potential employees when so many other resources aren’t available. As we all work to navigate COVID-19 and its impacts, be sure you continue to prioritize and adapt your company culture!

The Key To Recruiting Top Candidates

We all know how important recruitment is for a company. The core of any company is its employees, so a good recruitment process is key to a successful company. But finding the right candidates isn’t as easy as it sounds. In fact, HR Dive reported a talent shortage was one of the top concerns of organizations going into 2019, and by the looks of it, that concern has remained strong as the year enters its half-way point.

So how can recruiters be successful as they seek out talented candidates for their open roles? We think we know one solution – and it’s easier than you think! A perks and discount program is one tool you can leverage during your recruitment to acquire the best talent possible. Check out why!

1. Demonstrates an Investment in Employee Financial Wellness

Did you know 85 percent of employees admitted to feeling anxious about their personal finances, which often interferes with their work? On top of that, 33 percent of respondents said they worry about their finances more than once a week! For almost any employee – and candidate – finances can be a stressful subject. But not all companies can invest in their employees’ financial wellness through monetary benefits, like a bonus or raise in salary. An easier and less expensive solution is a free perks and discounts program that finds other ways for employees to save, namely in the important purchases they’re making on things like cars, vacations, and everyday items. Showing your candidates an investment in their financial wellness will help increase their attraction to your organization!

2. Encourages Employee Work/Life Balance

Almost half of HR leaders say between 20-50 percent of their employee turnover is due to workplace burnout. And when job seekers begin looking for a new job, what is one of the top qualities they look for? A recent Glassdoor study found that 47 percent of respondents said a work-life balance is a top-selling point for organizations they’re considering. But that balance is a difficult thing to strike for employers. Believe it or not, a perks and discounts program can help with this. When employers encourage employees to use a program that offers discounts in categories like travel, health and wellness, and personal hobbies, they’re thus encouraging their employees to pursue their interests outside of work that will keep them healthy and offer a source of relief from the stress that can come from the workplace.

3. Keeps Company Competitive in Recruitment Efforts

With such a strong talent shortage taking place in the recruitment field, finding a way to remain competitive in the hunt for talented candidates feels like a never-ending battle. Companies can easily tout a great work culture or a development program. In fact, we firmly believe all companies should do so! But how can you separate your organization from the crowd? Offer a competitive voluntary benefits suite, perks and discounts program included, that helps round out an already enticing offer for your top candidates. Over half of respondents to a Glassdoor survey said they strongly consider the perks and benefits included in a job offer before accepting. Guarantee a positive response to your next offer letter by including a benefit like perks and discounts in the voluntary benefits you provide!

Every organization knows the importance of recruitment, both to their culture and their bottom line. If you’re looking to improve your employee recruitment, especially during a time when it’s becoming increasingly difficult to secure the best candidates, start leveraging your perks and discounts program as a recruitment tool! And if you don’t offer a perks and discounts program, now is the time to start. Click here to learn more about PerkSpot’s perks and discounts program.

HR and Marketing: A Match Made in Heaven

At first glance, the human resources and marketing departments of a company seem like opposites. Marketing works primarily with customers of a company, while HR is more preoccupied with the company’s employees. Yet, they have more similarities than meets the eye.

Both departments are entrenched in the brand of a company, and how to convey it appropriately for others to consume. For marketing, it’s customers, and for human resources, it’s fellow employees. It makes sense for the two departments to come together and work together for a collective goal. Check out these three situations when HR should consider collaborating with their marketing department!

1. Recruitment and Hiring

Human resources has long owned the recruiting and interviewing process of any company, and that shouldn’t be changing anytime soon. However, a shakeup in your hiring might not be a bad idea for your company. Recruitment marketing is a rising trend in HR, which can mainly be attributed to the growing importance of social media, a more competitive job market, and the entry of the millennial generation in the workforce, according to a recent survey by HR.com. So how can you utilize your company’s marketing department to the best of your ability? Depending on the size and scope of your company and recruitment, options like employee referrals and brand advocates, a personalized career page, and targeted ads are all ways you can improve the quality of your hiring. Keep in mind, no two companies are the same, meaning their recruitment and interviewing process won’t be either. Some companies might not have the bandwidth or the budget to support all of these initiatives, so open up a conversation with your marketing department to come up with ways you can individualize your recruitment process so it fits your company well.

2. Onboarding

Once you’ve found that perfect new hire, it’s time to onboard them! But if you’re relying on the same onboarding process you’ve had in place for years, it might feel stale. Once again, this is a fantastic opportunity for your marketing department to help breathe life into your onboarding process. A study by Jobvite found that almost 30% of employees leave their new job within the first 90 days of employment. The main reason? Their day-to-day role wasn’t what they expected it to be. Make sure you fix this problem with your new onboarding process. Explain in clear detail not only what you expect of your new hires, but how they can succeed in their role and how you can assist them in doing so. While HR is the expert on the information that needs to be conveyed during onboarding, look to your marketing department to offer insight on the best way to convey that information, making it an effective and informative onboarding process for each new hire.

3. Company Culture

We know how important company culture is.  A company’s culture speaks to the values it upholds, the environment employees get to work in, and the goals they work toward. This is perhaps the best instance in which marketing and HR can work together. Not only do both departments have a holistic view of the company that other departments might not possess, but they’re also stakeholders in the two most important elements of company culture – the brand and the people. Marketing has a deep understanding of a company’s brand, and HR works closely with employees. Combined, it’s a match made in company culture heaven. Using HR’s know-how and marketing’s creativity, brainstorm to design unique strategies for implementing a company culture you know your employees will appreciate and enjoy. This can range from something simple like a company outing to a more extensive learning and development program tailored for your employees.

Sometimes, the best ideas come from where you least expect them. If your hiring, onboarding, or company culture could use some TLC, it’s time to join forces with your marketing department! What unexpected ideas have you come up with when working with a different department? Let us know!

4 Ways to Highlight Company Culture Before You Hire

Jessica Herrin, the co-founder of Stella & Dot, said “Shaping your culture is more than half done when you hire your team.” Here at PerkSpot, we agree – culture is one of the most important elements of our company and an incredibly crucial part of our hiring process. But how do you impart your culture to a potential job candidate in a small amount of time, when it’s so important? Try one of these great tips!


We believe there are 4 easy ways to highlight company culture during an interview:

  • Use Social Media
  • Introduce Core Values
  • Involve Other Departments
  • Give an Office Tour

Use Social Media

The average internet user has at least 5 social media accounts. Odds are, the candidate you’re interviewing has at least one, and they’ve used it to scope out your company before even firing off an application. Use this knowledge to your advantage, and show off your culture on social media. Upload fun pictures of company events and outings to your Instagram or post interesting blogs and articles illustrating your company culture. This will give candidates an inside look at the company so they know what to expect.

Introduce Core Values

At PerkSpot, we take our core values seriously, because they are one of the main motivators for what we do and how we do it. Chances are, you created your company culture with your core values in mind, so why not put them on display during the interview process too? If a potential candidate doesn’t feel that they will align with the values you hold dear, there’s a good chance they won’t enjoy the culture you’ve created either.

Inter-Departmental Interviewing

One thing we’ve learned recently is the importance of hiring to add to company culture. Keeping this mentality when recruiting and hiring employees has allowed us to create a diverse and fresh workforce. We are proud of what we’ve created and love to demonstrate this during the hiring process! Be sure to bring in different employees from different departments who you think can both challenge and excite a potential job candidate. Not only will this help you see whether that candidate will work well with your current employees, but it gives the candidate a good idea of the way each employee contributes and adds to your company culture.

Office Tour

You know the popular adage, the eyes are the window to the soul? Well, we believe that the office is the window to the company – and its culture. A potential candidate can learn a lot from surveying the future office he or she could be working in. Before or after the interview, offer a quick tour. Point out interesting decorations, where each department sits, and where employees enjoy hanging out or eating lunch. You put a lot of thought and effort into creating a great environment for your employees to work, so you should show it off! Plus, a quick tour can stir up excitement in a candidate and give them great insights into how your company and its employees interact on a day-to-day basis.

Culture is important to your company, and it should be important to job candidates as well. Each company’s culture is unique – by displaying it for a job candidate, it helps both of you get a better idea of what the other is looking for!

Is There a Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion?

 

….And Do We Really Need Both?

Diversity and inclusion are two of the most popular buzzwords in HR today. But, let’s be honest. How many of us have truly spent the time to break each of these down and what they mean? Do we know the difference between the two? Plus, if they aren’t the same thing, do we really need both?

We’re breaking down Diversity and Inclusion and what these two mean for our businesses

  • Definition of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion
  • Why Diversity Matters
  • Why Inclusion Matters
  • The Case for Both Diversity and Inclusion

Defining D&I:

First, let’s get our definitions straight with Merriam-Webster:

Diversity:

The condition of having or being composed of differing elements. Try thinking of diversity outside of human resources. Really, it’s just adding variety to something. You could have a diverse palate by enjoying foods from different cultures, or a diverse wardrobe that contains all the colors of the rainbow.

Inclusion:

The act of including; the state of being included. For inclusion, maybe it’s helpful to think in terms of membership of a group or club. All the members actively decide to include someone on the outside. This is the act of inclusion.

The Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion

There’s a well-known quote by D&I expert, Vernā Myers, that puts it perfectly, ”Diversity is being invited to the party. Inclusion is being asked to dance.”. Diversity is great because it brings more ideas and perspectives to the table. Inclusion complements diversity by embracing those differences and finding ways to make every perspective feel welcomed and every voice heard.

Diversity Matters

Did you know that more CEOs in America are named David than are women? That’s powerful stuff when you think about the impact on these businesses’ bottom line. In “Diversity Matters” by McKinsey, they surveyed 366 businesses in Canada, Latin America, the U.S., and the U.K. to find out the effect of diversity on financial returns. The findings were significant: Companies in the top for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians, and companies in the top for gender diversity are 15 percent more likely to have higher returns.

Making your workplace more diverse isn’t guaranteed to be easy, but it’s definitely worth it.

Inclusion Matters

Diversity isn’t the only initiative producing high returns. In fact, in a study by Deloitte Australia, reported that when employees felt included, companies saw an 80% uptick in business performance. If this isn’t a case for inclusion, we don’t know what is! Employees who experience inclusion are more motivated to work harder, making a huge impact on the business.

You Need Both Diversity and Inclusion

So what good is a party without a little dancing, right? Diversity and inclusion go hand in hand in building a stronger workplace. Bringing in a ton of new perspectives and ideas is the first step. However, if employees don’t feel comfortable voicing these opinions, it’s a moot point. On the other hand, with nothing but a homogenous group, inclusion loses its power. That’s why diversity and inclusion are two sides of the same token. We have to seek out a diverse workplace. Then, we have to work to make each employee feel included and respected.

We’ve come a long way, but we still have a long road ahead of us. What are some ways your business is making a difference for D&I?

the ultimate guide to a better workplace

The Recruitment Resolution Every HR Professional Should Make This Year

According to an article by Entrepreneur, January marks the beginning of a highly active hiring season. Job seekers are putting the finishing touches on their resumes and signing up for every career fair and job alert under the sun to find their perfect position. But what are you doing to find the perfect candidate?


If you’re an HR professional, you probably know it’s shaping up to be a tough season for those filling job openings. If you want yours to be a success, here’s the resolution you should be making this new year:

This year, HR professionals should be thinking like marketers. How can you do this? Here are a few ideas for finding the marketer within:

1. Use Social Media

We all know that social media can be a great tool for communicating with clients and customers, but it’s beginning to make its way onto the recruitment scene as well. Almost 60% of employees said they found their current position with their company through social media. And why not? It’s a cost-free and effective method of finding candidates for a position that you might have never encountered otherwise. If you aren’t using social media platforms to seek out new hires, make 2019 the year when you start!

2. Find Employee Advocates

A great recruitment strategy should let your company culture shine from the inside out. Your company most likely already markets the products or services they offer. This year, up your game by having employees act as brand ambassadors, speaking on reasons why they love working at your company. Create a strong network of individuals who will both fit into your company’s culture, as well as add to it. Place a strong emphasis on your values and mission statement in the job description.

3. Reach out

You can’t expect job applicants to do all the work. In 2019, we aren’t posting a job opening and waiting for applications to pour in. Instead, we’re putting in the work to find the candidate that is just right. Just like marketers use their content to engage potential leads, you can do the same for potential job candidates. Do your research and understand exactly what individual candidates are looking for in their future role, and then show them why you can offer those things.

In 2019, put your efforts towards attracting the top talent. Get in touch with your inner marketer, and it’ll be a breeze!

Onboarding 101

It is hiring season here at PerkSpot! We are super excited to bring on some new talent, but with that, comes the challenge of onboarding new employees well and integrating them into our culture.

As you look to attract, recruit and onboard new talent, here are few tips that we’ve learned along the way.

Before They Start

In order to make the first day/week run as smoothly as possible, it’s important to start this process before day one. Make sure you have sent out all the necessary paperwork for them to complete, think through all the tools they might need (both tech and otherwise), and maybe even implement a little fun. You could have their favorite breakfast waiting for them when they arrive or maybe their favorite snacks to munch on throughout the day. These small gestures go a long way in making your new employee feel welcome.

Day One

All your ducks in a row and now you’re anxious and waiting for your new hire to start! There should always be some flexibility built into your onboarding plan, but it’s important to start with a clear agenda and expectations for your new hire. Their manager should outline a plan for their first 90 days and sit down to walk them through the role and how to be successful. And don’t forget about the big picture! Sometimes we can dive right into the nitty gritty without discussing how their role plays into the overall mission of the business. Discuss how they’ll play a part in making your company successful so they’ll feel empowered to make a difference.

Week One

The first week is a great time to start with a team meeting and key introductions for people they’ll be working with the most. For many of our new hires, we start their first day with a team meeting to discuss what we’re working on currently, schedule job shadowing sessions throughout the week so they can get a feel for each department, and arrange one-on-one time with the key contacts they’ll be working alongside. While knowledge is important, getting to know the people on their team and in the company will ensure that they feel comfortable reaching out when they need help.

Month One

Onboarding doesn’t just begin and end in their first week. Depending on the role, it could take months to truly feel up to speed and comfortable. Make sure you plan a check-in at least after the first 30 days (we rely on weekly check-ins at PerkSpot) to stay in the know on where they’re struggling or excelling. You should have established some expectations on the first day for where they should be at this point, so revisit that plan and make adjustments as needed. You may discover the need for additional training or resources or find that they are able to tackle projects more quickly than anticipated. Either way, this is a great time to course correct and plan for the following months.

What are some tips you’ve found helpful for onboarding? We’d love to hear from you!

Build Your Employer Brand, Start with Core Values

One of the best things we’ve done this year as a company is to bring our core values into the forefront of everything we do. As we seek to build our employer brand and focus on recruitment, these company values have become an integral part of our daily lives.

In many ways, core values are how we present ourselves to the outside world.

Here’s why they matter for your employer brand:

They foster employee advocacy.

In a Gallup report, 41% of employees said they don’t know what their companies stand for and what makes their brand different from their competitors. Creating core values is crucial to bridging the gap between the day-to-day grind and the overall purpose and mission behind what you do. If you’re just starting to identify your core values, try polling your employees on what drives them to come to work everyday. You should notice some common themes. We asked PerkSpotters to come up with one word to describe PerkSpot and overwhelmingly heard “fun”. Today, “We Have Fun” is one of our values we live by, and it’s doesn’t hurt our recruitment efforts either!

They strengthen consistency.

When the whole company is aligned on the same values, it makes consistency easy. One of the values that drives us and holds us accountable is that “We Aim High”. Think about how your core values align with specific tasks. For us, this means asking different questions: Does this project represent aiming high? Are we aiming high in our team meetings or priorities? By building consistency through core values, outsiders will gain a sense of what your company is about and want to be a part of what you’re doing.

They cultivate a competitive edge.

You might not be the only company who does what you do. But, your company values should represent what sets you apart. We’ve all heard the story of how PerkSpot founder, Chris Hill, started this business in his apartment, eating ramen noodles everyday. While we’re grateful for our growth and success, “We Stay Humble” remains a core value in our business today. Make sure visitors can sense what you’re about right when they walk through the door. Make your values unique to your business and evidence of how you’re different than the competition.

They create a sense of humanity.

Core values, if done well, bring your business to life. They should go beyond just a catch phrase or a slogan painted on your walls. Our values all start with “We”, with our last value being “We Value People”. So much of what we do is centered our the people-element of our business. Who is your business serving? How are you making a difference in the lives of others? Remember who you serve and bring that humanity into your core values.

How does your company use core values to build your employer brand? What are some ways you live out these values in your day-to-day?

Recruiting for Remote Workers: What to Look For

As today’s world becomes more and more interconnected, working from home and hiring remote workers has become part of almost every office life. As you seek to find workers who can provide value, even from a distance, our recruitment strategies also need to evolve with the ever-changing workforce. When recruiting for remote workers, here’s what to look for:

Where are they?

EVERYWHERE. The tricky thing about remote workers is that they aren’t limited to the local area so it can often be harder to mine through candidates. Start with your website and blog. These will be people who are already obsessed with your company and would be happy to apply or recommend someone that would be a great fit. You can also try sites like FlexJobs or WeWorkRemotely.com that provide listings just for remote opportunities.

Who are they?

There is a big difference between someone who likes the idea of working in their pajamas, than a worker to thrives in a quiet, private environment. Look for workers who prove they have what it takes to handle the unique challenges they’ll face from working remotely. Ask them about past experiences where they have been productive working alone or collaborating across offices. Forbes says you should ask these candidates two questions:

  • Tell me about a time you’ve made an important decision without the help of a supervisor or boss?
  • Could you tell me about a time you got tough feedback from a boss?

These questions provide great insight into how they problem solve and can handle feedback when they don’t have the luxury of meeting face to face.

What do they want?

It’s obviously important to know what you’re looking for, but it’s also super important to keep in mind what these employees want. Fast Company has a great article that explains what most remote workers need from their bosses. Think: advanced technology, open door policies, and of course, great communication skills. When you’re recruiting or interviewing remote candidates, be sure to talk about your communication structure and process. Highlight expectations and focus on how they’ll be supported to meet these goals.

How do we get them?

You’ve found your perfect remote employee, but now it’s time to let them know why they should choose your company. While they won’t be in office to access the free snacks or comfy lounge chairs, there are awesome perks you can provide to workers near and far. Did someone say Employee Discount Programs? Obviously, we’re a little bias, but PerkSpot is a great recruitment and retention tool for employees scattered all over the U.S.. We even offer a plethora of local discounts so they can find deals right in their own neighborhood! Other ideas for perks could be ample time-off, sabbaticals, or an annual stipend for continuing education.

Finding great remote workers can be difficult, but with these tips, you’ll be staffing up in no time!

It’s Time for HR and Recruitment to Take a Break

Over the years, Human Resources has taken on a completely different face. HR no longer means just payroll and workplace conduct. Gone are the days of cheesy corporate videos warning employees informing them of workplace policies. From training and development, HR analytics, strategic planning, and talent acquisition, the roles HR plays are varied.

Which begs the question, where do we draw the line? Should HR really be involved in recruitment and interviewing? Is this their responsibility, and if not, whose is it?

We think it might be time for HR and recruitment to take a break. Here’s why.

It’s Not You, It’s Me

HR may not be to blame for drifting apart. Just as human resources has evolved, so has the talent acquisition field. You won’t find any help wanted ads in the paper. Technology has completely transformed the role of recruitment today. What once functioned under hiring managers and senior leaders, taking orders on which candidate to hire and reaching out to close the deal, now has morphed into a role all on its own. With data and analytics to drive the recruitment process, this has opened the door to a new way of recruiting and created an entity all its own. In other words, it’s not HR’s fault, Talent Acquisition has needs to be fulfilled.

We Should See Other People

Because recruitment isn’t the same as it used to be, it might be time for this department to spread its wings. From building the employer brand to improving the candidate experience, recruitment no longer requires a simple one and done interview process. Which leads us to question where this role should fall within an organization. Should marketing be responsible in order to control the employer brand? Historically, recruitment has fallen under HR simply due to compliance issues, and in light of the #MeToo movement, this may not be changing tomorrow. On the other hand, acquiring talent is a special skill and many argue should not fall under the branch of Human Resources as there is simply too much involved. Perhaps the next stage in the recruitment evolution is moving out from under HR.

I Need to Be Alone for a While

For this reason, many organizations are beginning to create a talent acquisition department that stands on its own. Perhaps the best solution, as the department can collaborate with others but still function as its own entity. Talent acquisition today no longer depends on the human resource department or hiring manager to provide insights into their needs, although still valuable. Instead, these recruiters or TA specialists are experts on the job market and industry trends. As Recruiting Intelligence blog, ERE, states “Although there is merit in partnering with HR and marketing among other key stakeholders, as talent acquisition professionals we provide a unique and invaluable service to our hiring managers, senior leaders, and CEOs…. The emergence of “big data” and metrics helps to identify critical talent, enables us to source more strategically, and provide intelligence on how the competition is performing in efforts to hire talent. “

Do you think Recruiting should break up with HR or are they meant to be together forever? Leave us a comment!