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How Employee Discount Programs Support Generational Diversity in the Workplace

Diversity in the workplace is no longer a hot topic. Rather, it’s an important and permanent topic that should continue to be talked about and built upon. As a new generation enters the workplace, there’s a facet of diversity that we want to discuss: generational diversity. More importantly, how can you improve it in your workplace? We think we know one solution – a perks and discount program.

generational diversity in the workplace

We know what you’re thinking. What’s the connection between a workplace and a voluntary benefit like perks and discounts? More than you think! In today’s day and age, there can be up to four generations of employees working closely together in different departments or on different projects, and this is a great thing for the company. Not only does this mean you’re getting the benefit of different perspectives, opinions, and beliefs, but studies say the revenue of a business can increase by 19% when that business enjoys diversity. But that’s not as easy as it sounds. More often than not, employees want to go where they feel comfortable. Eventually, they end up working with people who look, think, and sound like them, creating a disparity in diversity for your workplace.

So what can you do to fix this? Obviously, a perks and discounts program is not a cover-all solution to a large problem like a lack of generational diversity in your workplace. However, it is a fantastic place to start. Here are three important reasons why:

1. Perks and Discounts Programs Offer Discounts for All Financial Situations

There’s no getting around the fact that different generations have different needs. Those differences, while great for creating a sense of generational diversity and inclusion in the workplace, can also make it difficult to find a solution that appeases all employees. The beauty of a perks and discounts program is that it manages to do just that! By providing an array of discounts in a variety of categories, every employee is able to find a discount they find valuable and useful to them individually.

2. Perks and Discounts Programs Help Support Financial Security

Yes, each generation is different. However, virtually every member of the four generations that make up your workforce has at least one thing in common, and that is a desire to be more financially secure. Whether it’s dealing with expensive student loans, a mortgage on a new house, or an ailing family member, most employees have at least one area in their life that causes financial stress in their lives. Fortunately, a perks and discounts program can offer some help here as well. Saving through exclusive perks and discounts relieves some of the financial pressure your employees, no matter their generation, are experiencing every day. This can help with a number of things; their productivity, stress levels, and sense of financial security, to name a few!

3. Perks and Discounts Programs Attract and Retain Talent of All Ages

Generational diversity is one thing that should always be on your mind when it comes to both hiring new employees and retaining your current employees. Let your perks and discounts program be your best friend when it comes to these areas of your business. A recent Glassdoor survey found that 79% of employees prefer new or additional benefits to a pay raise. Broken down even further, the survey found 89% of employees aged 18-34, 84% of employees aged 35-44, 70% of employees aged 45-54, and 66% of employees aged 55-64 said they would prefer those perks and benefits to a pay raise. Factoring those preferences in, a perks and discounts program seems like the perfect addition to your benefits offering to both attract and retain new and existing employees of all ages.

We know how important diversity is to a company. It can improve your company’s productivity, efficiency, and overall success. But achieving it can seem like an impossible goal. Start on the right foot by implementing a perks and discounts program that supports a movement of generational diversity in your workplace. Click here to learn more about PerkSpot’s Perks and Discounts program and get started today!

A Guide to Setting Your Remote Employees Up for Success

In 2005, 1.8 million US employees said they telecommuted for at least half of their scheduled working hours. The same study said in ten years, that number increased by 115%. That’s almost 4 million American workers who report telecommuting for work at some point in their week! The trend has only continued to grow, and there’s no reason to assume it will be going away soon. If you’re currently hiring, onboarding, or working with remote employees, here are some tips to set them up for success!remote employee

During the Interview

Ask the Right Questions

Hiring for an employee that will work remotely is vastly different from hiring an employee who spends all of their time in the office. Because of this, you’ll need to look for different qualities and characteristics than you would with an in-office employee. For example, remote employees should be highly self-motivated and remain engaged and productive, despite the lack of an office setting. During a prospective employee’s interview, make sure to ask questions that reveal those qualities, such as past successes during a remote work experience that demonstrates the employee has the ability to stay focused. If you know this position works closely with other employees in a team, ask how they stay communicative with fellow teammates even though they aren’t working in the same office space. Questions like these not only help you better understand the candidate and their working style, but it can also help prepare them for the position and what it entails.

Clearly Communicate Expectations

Candidates interviewing for a remote position often have prior experience working remotely. However, that doesn’t mean the standards in place with their last job were the same as the standards you set. During the final stages of an interview process, ensure that you clearly communicate what you expect from the employee. This could concern hours they work, tasks they complete, or something else entirely. Make sure they feel confident in their ability to fill this role to the best of their ability. They can’t feel completely confident without knowing everything that it entails, so it’s your responsibility to keep them informed.

During Onboarding

Ensure Proper Tech Requirements

Technology is one of the most important components in preparing for a remote worker. There are a number of different technological requirements that need to be acquired to set up a remote employee for success. After all, it’s impossible for them to properly communicate with their team and manager if they don’t have access to reliable internet, but this is only the beginning. Typically, companies will also want to invest in a shared file system (like Google Drive), a communication platform (like Slack), and a video conferencing application (like Skype) to ensure good communication among in-office and remote employees.

Design a Check-In Calendar

When you onboard your new employee, sit down and design a check-in plan that works for both of you. In the beginning, more frequent check-ins, like once a week, are recommended. After the employee settles into his or her role, decrease this to once every two weeks or once a month. During check-ins, ask questions about their current projects and challenges they are facing, but also remember to create a space for personal interaction. Remote employees still have a desire for the camaraderie that occurs more naturally in office atmospheres.

Beyond Onboarding

Create Face-to-Face Opportunities

21% of remote workers cited loneliness as their biggest problem. One of the best ways to combat this is by scheduling recurring face-to-face opportunities to meet with your remote workers in person. Some companies will designate regular “in the office” days in which all employees come in, perhaps for a team gathering or an all-company meeting. Others will schedule a monthly lunch or coffee date where an employee and his or her manager can meet to discuss the past month and plan important projects and deadlines that will come up in the future month.

Keep Up Communication

As an HR professional, good communication with employees should always be something that’s at the forefront of your mind. With remote employees, this is even more important. A remote employee can’t stop at your desk and chat about a question or concern that’s on their mind. They rely on other communication methods, like email or Slack, to discuss important topics. That being said, make sure to monitor those platforms closely and respond timely to your remote workforce. That way, they know don’t feel ignored or pushed to the wayside.

Research says remote workers actually tend to be more productive in their flexible schedules. However, with all that freedom comes some challenges as well. As an HR professional, take these steps to make sure you’re helping your remote employees avoid those pitfalls and instead, set them up for success!

What HR Professionals Can Learn from Powerful Women

March is Women’s History Month, so we’re taking a good look at some powerful women – past and present – who can teach us important lessons about how to be the best HR professionals we can be.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg & Ethics

You may know her as Notorious RBG, or that really fit Supreme Court justice, but Ruth Bader Ginsburg is best known for her strong beliefs, which she holds while serving as the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court. When you think about Ginsburg, ethics is one of the first words that should come to mind. Similarly, it’s a quality often associated with HR professionals. Many like to say HR professionals serve as the conscious of their company, and that isn’t far off the mark. It is your responsibility as an HR professional to uphold your company’s values and policies, and to make sure each employee practices them properly – much like Ginsburg does each day she dons her Supreme Court justice robe.

Serena Williams & Confidence

The field of HR is bound to challenge you at many points throughout your career, and there’s one thing you’ll need to get you through it: confidence. That is something Serena Williams knows a thing or two about! Williams is a record-breaking tennis star, mother, and businesswoman, and she is unapologetically proud of all of those accomplishments. But that confidence is something many women struggle with. Yet, as HR professionals, it’s absolutely vital. During the course of your career, you will experience things that will test you. Maybe your company is taking a risk with a new venture, maybe you’ve just accepted an exciting (but scary) promotion, or maybe you’re creating and implementing a brand new program that will shake up how things are run in your workplace. Whatever challenge you’re facing, channel Williams’s inner confidence and believe in yourself and the work you’re doing.

Madeleine Albright & Conflict Management

One of the most important qualities in any position, especially that of an HR manager, is conflict resolution. No one knows this quality better than Madeleine Albright, the first woman to serve as US Secretary of State. During her tenure, she became a renowned negotiator and conflict manager. To do so, she placed a strong emphasis on putting yourself in the other person’s shoes, a lesson many HR professionals should take to heart. Whether your responsibility is to conduct conflict resolution between two fellow employees or negotiate a specific policy or contract, understand what your peer wants as well. Once you reach this understanding, you can find a solution that satisfies both parties.

Oprah Winfrey & Development

As an HR professional, you should always be seeking out new ways to learn and develop, both for yourself and for your employees. Developing personally and professionally will allow you to continuously grow in your career. Who better to learn this important lesson from than Oprah Winfrey? Born in rural Mississippi, Oprah began co-anchoring the local news in Tennessee at 19 and took a low-rated Chicago talk show to number one by age 29. Two years later, The Oprah Winfrey Show, an hour-long talk show, was being broadcast nationally. But Winfrey never rested – she went on to be an actress, producer, author, and philanthropist. She is the epitome of someone who is never satisfied. Take a page out of Oprah’s book and begin focusing on new ways you can develop yourself!

These women are all incredible examples of people who worked hard each and every day. They are the embodiment of some of the crucial qualities any HR professional should possess. What powerful women inspire you? Leave a comment and let us know!

Is There a Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion?

….And Do We Really Need Both?

Diversity and inclusion are two of the most popular buzzwords in HR today. But, let’s be honest. How many of us have truly spent the time to break each of these down and what they mean? Do we know the difference between the two? Plus, if they aren’t the same thing, do we really need both?

We’re breaking down Diversity and Inclusion and what these two mean for our businesses

  • Definition of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion
  • Why Diversity Matters
  • Why Inclusion Matters
  • The Case for Both Diversity and Inclusion

difference between diversity and inclusion

Defining D&I:

First, let’s get our definitions straight with Merriam-Webster:

Diversity:

The condition of having or being composed of differing elements. Try thinking of diversity outside of human resources. Really, it’s just adding variety to something. You could have a diverse palate by enjoying foods from different cultures, or a diverse wardrobe that contains all the colors of the rainbow.

Inclusion:

The act of including; the state of being included. For inclusion, maybe it’s helpful to think in terms of membership of a group or club. All the members actively decide to include someone on the outside. This is the act of inclusion.

The Difference Between Diversity and Inclusion

There’s a well-known quote by D&I expert, Vernā Myers, that puts it perfectly, ”Diversity is being invited to the party. Inclusion is being asked to dance.”. Diversity is great because it brings more ideas and perspectives to the table. Inclusion complements diversity by embracing those differences and finding ways to make every perspective feel welcomed and every voice heard.

Diversity Matters

Did you know that more CEOs in America are named David than are women? That’s powerful stuff when you think about the impact on these businesses’ bottom line. In “Diversity Matters” by McKinsey, they surveyed 366 businesses in Canada, Latin America, the U.S., and the U.K. to find out the effect of diversity on financial returns. The findings were significant: Companies in the top for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians, and companies in the top for gender diversity are 15 percent more likely to have higher returns.

Making your workplace more diverse isn’t guaranteed to be easy, but it’s definitely worth it.

Inclusion Matters

Diversity isn’t the only initiative producing high returns. In fact, in a study by Deloitte Australia, reported that when employees felt included, companies saw an 80% uptick in business performance. If this isn’t a case for inclusion, we don’t know what is! Employees who experience inclusion are more motivated to work harder, making a huge impact on the business.

You Need Both Diversity and Inclusion

So what good is a party without a little dancing, right? Diversity and inclusion go hand in hand in building a stronger workplace. Bringing in a ton of new perspectives and ideas is the first step. However, if employees don’t feel comfortable voicing these opinions, it’s a moot point. On the other hand, with nothing but a homogenous group, inclusion loses its power. That’s why diversity and inclusion are two sides of the same token. We have to seek out a diverse workplace. Then, we have to work to make each employee feel included and respected.

We’ve come a long way, but we still have a long road ahead of us. What are some ways your business is making a difference for D&I?

the ultimate guide to a better workplace

5 Statistics You Need to Build a Better Workplace

We’ve been diving into what makes a better workplace. In fact, we even wrote a book about it. But, we get that you’re busy. That’s why we’ve put together our top five statistics you absolutely need to know to build a better workplace in 2019.

5 statistics to build a better workplace

80% of Employees are Motivated to Work Harder When They Receive Appreciation

Not only that, but they’re also more motivated to stay at their company. We’re no strangers to recognition and in 2019, you shouldn’t be either. Employees are moving to places where they feel appreciated, and they’re staying there.

By 2025, 75% of the Workforce Will Be Millennials

Tired of hearing about millennials? While this is not a new topic, it’s important to think about how we develop this generation into the future leaders of our workforce. Now, more than ever, it’s time for us to start training and mentoring millennial employees in preparation for a new generation of managers, directors, and executives.

45% of Managers Don’t Receive Formal Training

Most of the people leading our offices and developing younger employees have never actually received any type of formal training themselves. This statistic should really wake us up. It’s time to provide real opportunities for professional development, especially for our leadership.

Almost 70% of Sexual Harassment Cases Occur in the Office

The #MeToo movement isn’t going away any time soon. In 2019, it’s imperative that every organization has a plan for handling sexual harassment.

48% of Employees Are Worried About Their Finances

You may think it’s not your responsibility to help employees with their personal finances. However, studies show 70% of employers would disagree with you. In order to maintain a competitive edge in today’s workplace, employees want to work somewhere that values them. This means providing education and resources around financial health and well-being.

These are our top five stats, but you can find these in more in our e-book, How to Build a Better Workplace.
the ultimate guide to a better workplace

How I’m Contributing to a Better Workplace

Our mission at PerkSpot is to inspire employees to love where they work. But sometimes, it’s the employees themselves who are inspiring us. We asked a few PerkSpotters to share a few ways they try to make a difference.

Here are our favorite quotes from inside the walls of the PerkSpot:

Office Snacks

“I like to try and pick up a snack or treat once a week so people can get a break in the afternoon. It’s a small gesture, but a great way to bring everyone together.”
– Thomas B., Account Manager

Water Cooler Chat

“I try to follow up on things posted by coworkers on Slack to get to know people better and reinforce that their messages weren’t just sent out into the void – we care about it! Plus when people ask about my puppy it automatically brightens my day, so I like to try to do the same!”
– Kelly R., Account Management Associate

Neighborhood Treats

“I’ve always been a raised to share and give to others. It’s something my parents instilled in. So sharing stuff with PerkSpot has always made me feel like I’m sharing a piece of my childhood. Whenever I can, I bring delicious stuff from my neighborhood. PerkSpotters always ask ‘where did you get this’. It’s my way of sharing a piece of my neighborhood and the south side of Chicago.”
– Karla B., CS Lead

Positivity

“Attitudes are contagious – I always try (don’t always succeed, but try) to project a positive attitude, regardless of how stressed or anxious I am, with the hope that it spreads to my coworkers.”
– DJ E., Sales Operations Executive

Musical Favorites

“I like to find a person’s music and queue it up on the office stereo system. Unless it’s that one Mariah Carey Christmas song. I just. No.”
– Jace M., CEO

PerkSpotters are pretty great (and clearly we really love snacks), but we know it takes an army to build a Better Workplace. That’s why we’ve literally written the book on it.

We’re excited to announce our e-book, The Ultimate Guide to a Better Workplace where you can learn more about what it takes to make each place a better place to work.

the ultimate guide to a better workplace

How Do You Manage a Toxic Employee?

As much as we love to talk about great company cultures, the truth of the matter is that not every company is going to live up to these standards. Chances are at some point in your career you’ll be faced with some form of a toxic workplace. Hopefully, it’s just one or two people, but in extreme circumstances, it can be a systemic problem.

how do you manage a toxic employee perkspot culture

Signs of Toxic Employees

First of all, we need to know the warning signs of toxic employees. While many of the signs are obvious, some can be fairly nuanced and it’s important to keep your eyes and ears open.

Greta Gossip

“Did you hear…” This one is pretty obvious. Gossip and negatively is extremely contagious. Catch this before it gets out of hand.

Procrastinating Paul

“I’ll do it later…” Someone might be hopping into your head immediately. While this doesn’t always signal toxicity, it’s definitely something worth keeping an eye on.

Ellen Excuses

“I would do that but…” This is not only toxic, but it’s also annoying. Employees who are full of excuses can be hard to trust and rely on.

Michael Martyr

“I’ve been here until 9pm every night”. Sometimes our culture is quick to reward these over-achievers, but maybe it’s time to examine why they are staying in the office so late and if their work really merits the long hours.

Loner Larry

“I can do this myself”. Sometimes your highest achievers can also be the most toxic. Examine how the people around them are feeling and if they’re able to collaborate to achieve great results.

How to Manage Toxic Employees

Now that you’ve determined where toxicity might be living in your company, it’s time to do something about it. As HR leaders, managers, or individual contributors, there are a few ways to manage toxic employees (even if it means managing up).

Ask Honest Questions

While you may think it’s none of your business to dive into an employee’s personal life, if it’s affecting work, it’s time to find out what’s going on beneath the surface. Meet with this employee one-on-one and ask honest, direct questions to find out where they might be struggling. They don’t have to go into detail but having an idea of where they need more support will get you both back on the right track. Offer counseling resources if that’s an option, or find other ways to get to the root of the problem.

Lay Out Potential Consequences

Unfortunately there is a time when you have to start talking about the “or else” consequences of their actions. If the toxic behavior continues, the employee needs to know what actions you’ll take to prevent them or eliminate them all together.

Make a Plan for Follow-Up

You’ve gotten to the root of the issue. You’ve laid out the consequences. Now it’s time to put a plan in place for follow-up. This means scheduling regular one-on-ones to monitor their progress and support them on their journey. Hopefully, you already have one-on-one times in place for your employees, but if not, this is a great opportunity. Weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly – whatever works for you, but make sure they’re consistent and you don’t cancel when other responsibilities vie for your time.

Determine Next Steps

Best case scenario is that your employee does a 180 and becomes a star in your organization. However, it’s unlikely that will happen. That doesn’t mean it will result in termination, but it could mean switching the employee into a different role or changing up their responsibilities for the time-being. Keep a careful eye on their progress and be open to making moves in the future.

If you’re fighting toxicity in your workplace, we hope these tips are helpful for identifying and managing toxic employees. Have advice for someone fighting toxicity? Leave us a note in the comments.

The One Thing HR Leaders Do Every Day

You might be in the middle of Open Enrollment Season. You could also be working on some new initiatives for 2019. Maybe you’re ramping up for annual performance reviews. We get it. As HR professionals, you are busy.

one-thing-hr-leaders-do-every-day

In the midst of the chaos and day-to-day tasks that inevitably take over, it can be easy to lose sight of what’s truly important. That’s why we’re taking a time-out to discuss the one thing great HR leaders do every day, no matter what might come their way.

The one thing great HR leaders do every day is build relationships.

You’re in the business of humans, which means building deep, authentic relationships should be at the very core of what you do. According to Jim Mitchell, an executive coach, “Most leaders have been so busy building empires, they forgot to build relationships. Most think their job is to fix everything that is presented to them as a conundrum. But that’s not the job.” Beyond hiring and developing talent, improving retention, and creating strategies for engagement, there exists a very real need for true connections in the workplace.

Here are a few ways we can foster these relationships in practical ways:

Go beyond the surface.

Think about your relationships at work for a minute. Do they look and feel similar to your interactions at the grocery store or the gym? What do you know about your colleagues beyond what their calendar says? It’s easy to think that, as HR representatives, we should keep a safe distance from our colleagues. However, there is a healthy way to engage and interact with the people around us to improve employee engagement. In fact, in SHRM’s 2016 Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Report 77% of engaged employees said their relationships with coworkers was a top priority for them. Don’t be afraid to participate in non-work chatter and learn a little about the people around you. It can mean more than you know.

Listen.

How often do you utter the phrase “how are you?” without actually listening to the answer? Better yet, what about the non-verbal cues your colleague expresses? Do they actually seem “fine”, or is there looming anxiety beneath the surface? One of the best ways to engage in authentic relationships at work is to listen well. Listen to understand. Listen with purpose and intention. Listen with compassion and curiosity. You’ll be amazed at what you’ve missed in the past.

Be vulnerable.

While much of fostering great relationships involves paying attention to the other person, it is also important that we live by example. Practice vulnerability by being open with those around you. When someone asks how your day is going, don’t be afraid to tell them the truth. Obviously, as leaders, we have the responsibility to maintain positivity so we aren’t giving you permission to unload all your complaints. However, there is a way to be vulnerable, honest, and transparent that creates a safe space for your employees to share. Tell them how your project is going and what challenges you’re facing. You may appreciate the sounding board and they’ll start to view you as a little more human.

Recognize their achievements.

If you think about your relationships outside of the workplace, we know the value of saying “thank you” when your friends bring over a gift or when your spouse makes dinner. So why is it that inside the workplace, we view recognition as an after-thought? As you seek to foster meaningful relationships, we cannot leave out this key component for great relationships. While it all starts by listening and paying attention to your employees and colleagues, you should also remember to recognize their efforts. Just because they’re taking home a paycheck doesn’t mean they don’t need to hear a thank you every once in a while.

As you’re making your to-do list or wrapping up a project, remember that being an HR professional is not possible without also being human. Engage with the people around you and work to build better relationships this week.

Keeping and Supporting Young Talent

The workforce is changing. Millennials are no longer the “new” talent, they are THE talent, making up the largest generation in the workplace today. In addition, a recent study shows that 61 million Gen Zers (people born after 1996) are about to enter the workforce.

That means the talent pool is getting younger and it’s time for us to keep up. Keeping and supporting young talent means understanding exactly what they want in a career.

keeping-and-supporting-young-talent

Here are some tips for attracting and retaining young talent:

Find Ways to Add Value

While higher wages are an obvious place to add value for young employees, there are many ways to incentivize them beyond their paycheck. According to a recent study, approximately 20% of Millennials say they cannot afford their healthcare expenses and 46% of Gen Z say their main financial concern is student debt. Get creative with how you’re driving value for these younger generations. Offer better healthcare discounts or start a debt reimbursement program. Better yet, explore what an Employee Discount Program can do for you and your employees.

Offer Opportunities for Collaboration

While Millennials were coming of age with technology, Gen Z has become even more entrenched in social media and constant communication. Due to this change in atmosphere, collaboration is a key motivator for these younger employees. Surprisingly, however, they prefer in-person interactions over the phone, email or even texting when collaborating with co-workers.

Give Them Mentors, Not Managers

Micromanagement is the new smoking. Ok, ok, we made that up. But what we do know is that these younger generations are seeking out thriving relationships between their leaders. Mentorship is a hot topic among this crowd and that is only bound to increase as they take the workforce by storm. Maybe there’s a reason why 70% of multi-national companies are replacing their annual reviews in favor of performance management. Young talent wants specific feedback on their performance, and they don’t want to wait a year to receive it. In fact, studies show Millennials are receiving reviews either daily (19%), weekly (24%), or regularly (23%) versus the traditional annual format (3%).

Create a Culture That Matters

According to Gallup, Millennials turnover costs the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually. Whoa. We’ve learned a lot from the Millennial workplace and there are many trends that are sure to stay. Flexible hours are considered one of the biggest perks for these employees. They also want a job that is willing to support their career development. They actually want to find a job and stay there, which is great news! As we previously discussed, regular reviews are a great way to focus on career progression and support. In addition to reviews, makes ure you also find time to recognize their efforts, whether it’s through a formal program or as simple as a thank-you note. These few efforts can make a huge difference for your retention as you create a culture that truly matters to your employees.

As we begin to wrap up another year, it will be interesting to see how Gen Z continues to shape our workforce well into 2019. How is your business working to keep and support your young talent?

Onboarding 101

It is hiring season here at PerkSpot! We are super excited to bring on some new talent, but with that, comes the challenge of onboarding new employees well and integrating them into our culture.

onboarding-101

As you look to attract, recruit and onboard new talent, here are few tips that we’ve learned along the way.

Before They Start

In order to make the first day/week run as smoothly as possible, it’s important to start this process before day one. Make sure you have sent out all the necessary paperwork for them to complete, think through all the tools they might need (both tech and otherwise), and maybe even implement a little fun. You could have their favorite breakfast waiting for them when they arrive or maybe their favorite snacks to munch on throughout the day. These small gestures go a long way in making your new employee feel welcome.

Day One

All your ducks in a row and now you’re anxious and waiting for your new hire to start! There should always be some flexibility built into your onboarding plan, but it’s important to start with a clear agenda and expectations for your new hire. Their manager should outline a plan for their first 90 days and sit down to walk them through the role and how to be successful. And don’t forget about the big picture! Sometimes we can dive right into the nitty gritty without discussing how their role plays into the overall mission of the business. Discuss how they’ll play a part in making your company successful so they’ll feel empowered to make a difference.

Week One

The first week is a great time to start with a team meeting and key introductions for people they’ll be working with the most. For many of our new hires, we start their first day with a team meeting to discuss what we’re working on currently, schedule job shadowing sessions throughout the week so they can get a feel for each department, and arrange one-on-one time with the key contacts they’ll be working alongside. While knowledge is important, getting to know the people on their team and in the company will ensure that they feel comfortable reaching out when they need help.

Month One

Onboarding doesn’t just begin and end in their first week. Depending on the role, it could take months to truly feel up to speed and comfortable. Make sure you plan a check-in at least after the first 30 days (we rely on weekly check-ins at PerkSpot) to stay in the know on where they’re struggling or excelling. You should have established some expectations on the first day for where they should be at this point, so revisit that plan and make adjustments as needed. You may discover the need for additional training or resources or find that they are able to tackle projects more quickly than anticipated. Either way, this is a great time to course correct and plan for the following months.

What are some tips you’ve found helpful for onboarding? We’d love to hear from you!